Follow us on
Welcome Guest! You are here: Home » Health
Mystery solved behind missing penis bone!
Thursday December 15, 2016 12:21 PM, ANI

Washington: Ever wondered, why unlike most mammals, men have no bones in their penis? A new study explains the mystery of lost baculum (penis bone) in the human lineage tends to be monogamous-- where you are married to, or in a sexual relationship with, one person at a time.The research, published in the Royal Society journal Proceedings B, shows that the ancestral mammal, like humans, did not have a baculum - but both ancestral primates and carnivores did.

The baculum has been described as "the most diverse of all bones", varying dramatically in length, width and shape in the male mammals where it is present.

A new University College London study examined how the baculum evolved in mammals and explores its possible function in primates and carnivores - groups where many species have a baculum, but some do not.

The study may also provide clues as to why humans do not have a baculum.

"Our findings suggest that the baculum plays an important role in supporting male reproductive strategies in species where males face high levels of post-copulatory sexual competition," said first study author Matilda Brindle.

"Interestingly, humans have neither prolonged intromission durations, nor high levels of post-copulatory sexual competition. Given the results of our study, this may help to unravel the mystery of why the baculum was lost in the human lineage," Brindle explained.

In species where mating occurs between multiple males and females (known as polygamy), there is acute competition between males to fertilise a female, however, human mating systems are not like this.

Instead humans tend to be monogamous or, more rarely, polygynous (where one male mates with multiple females). In these circumstances, only one male has access to a female and post-copulatory competition between males is absent or very low level.

The work uncovers that the baculum first evolved in mammals between 145 and 95 million years ago.

"After the human lineage split from chimpanzees and bonobos and our mating system shifted towards monogamy," said co-author, Dr Kit Opie.

"This may have been the final nail in the coffin for the already diminished baculum, which was then lost in ancestral humans," Opie added.


Share this page
More Headlines
Voting begins for 14 municipal councils in Pune, Latur and other districts of Maharashtra
AR Rahman in Oscar race once again
Research: World's wet regions are getting wetter, dry regions are getting drier
US researchers identify source of kidney disease biomarker
Russian hacking of US Polls: Electoral College seeks detailed information ahead of vote
Scrapped Indian notes sail to Dubai to end up as furniture
Long queues at banks, ATMs after long weekend
Cyclone Vardah leaves debris, damage; dents digital payment mode in Tamil Nadu
Political leaders laundering black money, India Today TV sting reveals
Rs 12.44 lakh crore deposited in old notes till Dec 10: Reserve Bank of India
More women consider resigning as member, dissent within Muslim panel deepens
CBSE resolution on compulsory board exam for Class X students by January end
Indian basket of crude gains $3 as global oil prices surge to 18-month high
A complete meltdown of humanity in Aleppo, says United Nations
Fasting can kill cancer cells of common childhood leukemia
Know the nine fruits you should eat in winter for healthy skin
Thousands hit but Russia says no to US call for truce in Syrian city of Aleppo
Moving US Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem Trump's top priority: Kellyanne Conway
Islamic Banking has no relevance in India: Union Finance Ministry
Rs 2,000 note only a stopgap arrangement, will ultimately be withdrawn: RSS ideologue
Demonetisation: An assault on people
UPSC CAPF (Assistant Commandants) Exam 2016: Personal interviews begins on January 9
 Post Comments
Note: By posting your comments here you agree to the terms and conditions of